Atmospheric Fog and Covid-19

In response to many inquiries regarding the safety of using theatrical fogs and hazes, especially during Covid, here is a collection of documents addressing the science. Please let us know if you have further information to suggest including. You may contact us at info@asepo.org.


ASEPO Supports Using Glycol-Based Fog Fluids During Covid



Common Glycol Fog/Haze Misconceptions

During Covid-19


Can Covid hitch a ride on fog particles that I inhale?

A recent study by Aura H&S and Phylmar Group used a DNA tracer aerosolized into a room with and without atmospheric fog. Two types of fog were studied - glycol and glycerin. The study concluded that "Artificial fog use does not increase suspension time of respiratory aerosols, and therefore does not appear to increase the risk of airborne transmission of diseases from respiratory aerosols, such as COVID-19." You can view and download the full report HERE.


Does atmospheric fog & haze tax our respiratory systems, and thus make us more prone to infection?

According to the EPA research into 75 years of established peer-reviewed studies, there is no evidence that accepted exposure limits "tax" one's health. The droplets of water/glycol are organic and, when inhaled, whatever material doesn't evaporate into a gas is easily absorbed and processed by the body without causing stress. Heavy exposures can cause mucous membranes to become drier, but this is temporary and easily remedied with fresh air.


If glycols are so lethal to viruses, aren't they also harmful to me?

Many chemicals are safe for humans while also destructive to microbes. For example, the chlorine in your tap water is perfectly safe at established levels and even at the higher levels found in swimming pools. However, it can be very toxic consumed in high concentrations. Even oxygen is harmful to humans in high concentrations.


Are glycol-based fogs and hazes "pollutants"?

"Pollutant" is a very generalized term that includes tap water poured down a storm drain. The term can be inflammatory and provides no indication of actual hazard or toxicity. It is more important to know the actual risks associated with a material and its use, as well as how such risks are being properly mitigated to maintain safety. 


Are glycol-based fogs and hazes "irritants"?

According to OSHA, TEG and PG are NOT considered "irritants" or "sensitizers". This does not mean, however, that people with compromised health or heightened sensitivities won't experience aggravations from exposure. Such reactions are rare, and easily remedied by moving into fresh air and drinking water. 



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Follow the Facts & Science


There is a long history of medical studies and peer-reviewed journal reports confirming the anti-microbial characteristics of Triethylene Glycol (TEG) and Propylene Glycol (PG) vapors. 


Below are quotes from 75 years of these reports.

(Click to view all 5 pages • Endnote citations are hyperlinked to full reports)



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•• IMPORTANT WARNING ••


Can I use Glycol Haze as a "Disinfectant"?


Not legally.


Any "disinfectant" used in the workplace or around the public must be approved for that purpose by the US EPA. There is one fog fluid, Grignard Pure, consisting of TEG and water, that has been EPA approved for use in Georgia and Tennessee to fight Covid-19. More states will soon be added to the list. Our usual glycol fogs & hazes are still allowed to be safely used as a lighting enhancement effect as usual, but no anti-viral claims can be made about them.



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Ingredients of Various Fog/Haze Fluids


We took the liberty of reviewing the SDS's of many popular fog and haze fluids, and listing them in this easy-to-read table. Click on it to view and download a pdf version.



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